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SMSU Welcomes First Mustang Pathway Group

Published Wednesday, July 15, 2020
Erin Kline
Erin Kline

Bridging the education gap and providing access to more students is what SMSU is offering 18 first-year students who have enrolled in the Mustang Pathway Program (MPP), which began on Monday, July 13.

MPP is a collaborative partnership with Adult Basic Education. It is a five-week residential adaptive entry program with transition points that meet students where they are at as they pursue their academic goals. MPP offers access to higher education, allowing more students to earn their degrees at SMSU. 

Each of the 18 students has different reasons why they enrolled in the program. MPP provides the students with the tools and strategies needed to bridge academic and social gaps while acclimating them to their new academic environment.    

Students who participate in the free program take 5 credits: thee in English, and one each in reading and global experience. They also complete a math workshop.

The students are tested at the start of the program, and again halfway through, to assess their progress. They must earn a ‘C’ grade or better in order to successfully complete the Mustang Pathway program. Upon completion, they will be admitted to the Pathway Scholars program, and live on campus in the Mustang Pathway Living & Learning Community, located in the Buckingham residence hall.

Most of the students are from the Twin Cities and southwest Minnesota, though one is from Illinois, said Erin Kline, Associate Director of the Mustang Pathway program. “We are really excited to share this opportunity with students from across the state, and beyond,” she said.

The students will also take a career interest inventory, learn leadership strategies and participate in a mentoring program.

Mustang Pathway is in line with Minnesota States 2030 Goal to eliminate the educational equity gaps.

“The program really opens up opportunities for students who might not otherwise attend college,” said Kline. “It allows students to achieve their academic dream.”